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Euskal Idazleen Elkartea

Patxi Zubizarreta Dorronsoro > Extracts

Narrative (short story and novel)

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A Young Widow's Candidates

In a remote kingdom an elderly caliph succeeded in marrying an innocent, na´ve young girl with the help of a considerable fortune. The caliph died a few years later and the young girl, who by that time had turned into a beautiful woman, became the ruler of the kingdom.

As she was rich and charming many princes, caliphs and notables lost no time going to her to ask for her hand in marriage. But the woman wanted neither power nor more money, but a loving, playful young man who was the exact opposite of the old man.

So to everyone's surprise she made a general proclamation on an arranged day and time that all those who wished to marry her, be they rich or poor, should come to her palace.

To each one on the appointed day she said:
-Tell me about your way of life, what you like and what you do for a living.

The candidates, numbering a thousand and one, each obeyed the woman's orders, some interminably, others briefly, some gracefully others clumsily. But she chose only five of the young men: a snake charmer, a dancer, a prince, a shepherd and a carpenter. And she called each one to her room one by one.

When she came face to face with each of the five candidates, she made an identical request to each one, who became embarrassed and unnerved on hearing the following:

-In my presence, with me as your only witness, and in whatever way you prefer, I want you to act in the way you men do whenever you want to indulge in solitary pleasure. -And because they were captivated by the girl, they promised to do exactly what she had ordered them to do.

And the first to begin was the snake charmer. With the utmost grace he removed his clothes, and as he played a tune that could not have been more sensual he made the snake below his waist zigzag upwards. He did not touch it with his hands, but made the beast dance briefly, until the white forked tongue flowed and became tamed.

Then it was the dancer's turn. As if possessed by the devil, he rolled over and over on the floor and gradually removed his clothes as he jumped and pirouetted. When he was naked, he caressed the tool between his thighs and put it in his mouth -one of the greatest pleasures that men have been denied since time immemorial-, and in the end fell at the woman's feet prostrating and gasping for breath, as the remains of his seed dribbled out of his mouth.

It was the Prince's turn next. Used to having as many women as he wanted in the harem of his palace, he put all his energies into trying to raise his mace, but did not manage to do so alone.

The last but one was the shepherd. He fished an enormous trunk out from under his djellabah, of the type that would undoubtedly frighten a woman, and, he milked it with both his hands as if it were a goat's udder, until he had succeeded in making all the milk gush out.

And the last to arrive was the carpenter. The young man led the woman into the gardens until they reached a willow with a smooth bark. He then produced a knife and cut three hollows in its trunk, two at chest height and a third a cubit further down. He placed two figs from a fig tree in the top ones and in the lower one an apple without its stalk and with a fairly wide hole cut into it. And as he caressed the tree he began to lick and eat the figs and apple, slowly, sweetly, without haste, as if he were Adam tasting the forbidden fruit for the very first time. And even though his eyes remained closed the whole time, he was the only candidate who looked firmly into the woman's eyes at the moment when he was about to melt with pleasure inside the apple.

After receiving that look full of desire the woman did not hesitate to offer the carpenter her hills and her wood, her figs and her apple. He was the very loving, playful young man she had dreamt of; he was her husband.
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